et inde producit sectam


et inde producit sectam
And thereupon he brings suit. The formal conclusion of a common-law declaration was always in these words. Originally, they meant that the plaintiff came with his witnesses or followers. He was then required to use them to make out at least a prima facie case by their testimony before the defendant was put to the trouble of answering the charge. This latter practice was discontinued in the reign of Edward the Third, but the form of it survived. See 3 Bl Comm 295.

Ballentine's law dictionary. . 1998.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • inde producit sectam — See et inde producit sectam …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • et inde producit sectam — /ed indiy prad(y)uwsat sektam/ And thereupon he brings suit. The Latin conclusion of a declaration, except against attorneys and other officers of the court. 3 Bl.Comm. 295 …   Black's law dictionary

  • et inde producit sectam — /ed indiy prad(y)uwsat sektam/ And thereupon he brings suit. The Latin conclusion of a declaration, except against attorneys and other officers of the court. 3 Bl.Comm. 295 …   Black's law dictionary

  • secta — /sekta/ In old English law, suit; attendance at court; the plaintiffs suit or following, i.e., the witnesses whom he was required, in the ancient practice, to bring with him and produce in court, for the purpose of confirming his claim, before… …   Black's law dictionary


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