general and notorious recognition


general and notorious recognition
As a means of legitimation of a child born out of wedlock: -open and extensive recognition; not necessarily universal recognition; such conduct and bearing of the father toward the child that a substantial portion of the community believes that the child is his. 10 Am J2d Bast § 52.

Ballentine's law dictionary. . 1998.

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