indictare


indictare
To indict.

Ballentine's law dictionary. . 1998.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • indict — [in dīt′] vt. [altered (infl. by L) < ME enditen, to write down, accuse < Anglo L indictare < LL * indictare < L in, against + dictare: see DICTATE] to charge with the commission of a crime; esp., to make a formal accusation against… …   English World dictionary

  • Indite — In*dite ([i^]n*d[imac]t ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inditing}.] [OE. enditen to indite, indict, OF. enditer to indicate, show, dictate, write, inform, and endicter to accuse; both fr. LL. indictare to show, to accuse, fr. L …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indited — Indite In*dite ([i^]n*d[imac]t ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inditing}.] [OE. enditen to indite, indict, OF. enditer to indicate, show, dictate, write, inform, and endicter to accuse; both fr. LL. indictare to show, to accuse …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Inditing — Indite In*dite ([i^]n*d[imac]t ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inditing}.] [OE. enditen to indite, indict, OF. enditer to indicate, show, dictate, write, inform, and endicter to accuse; both fr. LL. indictare to show, to accuse …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • indite — transitive verb (indited; inditing) Etymology: Middle English enditen, from Anglo French enditer to write, compose, from Vulgar Latin *indictare, frequentative of Latin indicere to make known formally, proclaim, from in + dicere to say more at… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • indite — inditement, n. inditer, n. /in duyt /, v.t., indited, inditing. 1. to compose or write, as a poem. 2. to treat in a literary composition. 3. Obs. to dictate. 4. Obs. to prescribe. [1325 75; ME enditen < OF enditer < VL *indictare, deriv. of L… …   Universalium

  • indettare — in·det·tà·re v.tr. (io indétto) BU lett., istruire, ammaestrare sul da farsi; imbeccare {{line}} {{/line}} DATA: av. 1390. ETIMO: lat. *indĭctāre, comp. di in con valore raff. e dictāre dettare , cfr. fr. ant. enditier …   Dizionario italiano

  • indict — in|dict [ınˈdaıt] v [I and T] law especially AmE [Date: 1300 1400; : Anglo French; Origin: enditer, from Old French, to write down , from Latin indicere to say publicly or officially , from dicere to say ; influenced by Medieval Latin indictare… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • indicate — [17] Like index, indicate has its origins in the Latin stem *dik ‘point out’. In this case the base form was the verbal derivative dicāre ‘proclaim’ (ultimate ancestor also of English abdicate [16], dedicate [15] and predicate [16]), which with… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • indict — (v.) c.1300, from Anglo Fr. enditer accuse, indict (late 13c.), O.Fr. enditer to dictate or inform, from L.L. *indictare to declare, proclaim in writing, from L. in in (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + dictare to say, compose in words (see DICTATE (Cf …   Etymology dictionary


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