widow


widow
A woman of single status because of the death of her husband. A woman who survives the man to whom she was married at the time of his death. Meeker v Draffen, 201 NY 205, 94 NE 626. A woman whose husband has died and who has not married again. Re McArthur, 210 Cal 439, 292 P 469, 72 ALR 1318. The word means a woman who has lost her husband by death, and has no application to a divorced woman. O'Malley v O'Malley, 46 Mont 549, 129 P 501. There is authority which holds that the term, as used in some statutes, may be applied to a woman in respect of her deceased husband, although she has remarried since his death. Re McArthur, 210 Cal 439, 292 P 469, 72 ALR 1318. The right of action for wrongful death given by statute for the benefit of a widow for the death of her husband is not divested by her subsequent marriage. 22 Am J2d Dth § 67. The right of the widow of an insured to the balance due under a national service life insurance policy after the death of the named insured, under a statutory provision giving the "widow" a preference over brothers and sisters of the insured, is not barred by her remarriage. Riley v United States (CA4 W Va) 212 F2d 692. 44 ALR2d 1182. As to meaning of term under the Federal Longshoremen's and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act, see Anne: 98 L Ed 740.

Ballentine's law dictionary. . 1998.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • WIDOW — (Heb. אַלְמָנָה, almanah; pl. אַלְמָנוֹת, almanot). Biblical Period The Hebrew substantive almanah, usually translated widow, often does not simply denote a woman whose husband is dead, but rather a once married woman who has no means of… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Widow — • Canonical prescriptions concerning widows in the Old Testament refer mainly to the question of remarriage Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Widow     Widow      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Widow — Wid ow (w[i^]d [ o]), n. [OE. widewe, widwe, AS. weoduwe, widuwe, wuduwe; akin to OFries. widwe, OS. widowa, D. weduwe, G. wittwe, witwe, OHG. wituwa, witawa, Goth. widuw[=o], Russ. udova, OIr. fedb, W. gweddw, L. vidua, Skr. vidhav[=a]; and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Widow — Wid ow, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Widowed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Widowing}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To reduce to the condition of a widow; to bereave of a husband; rarely used except in the past participle. [1913 Webster] Though in thus city he Hath widowed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • widow — n. A wife who remains alive after her husband dies. The Essential Law Dictionary. Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. Amy Hackney Blackwell. 2008. widow A woman whose husband died while she was married to him …   Law dictionary

  • Widow — Wid ow, a. Widowed. A widow woman. 1 Kings xvii. 9. This widow lady. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • WIDOW — is a full length album recorded by British rock band Ritual released in 1983. The album gained notability for the band when it was played several times by Alan Freeman on the Friday Rock Show.Also played on The World Service during an hour long… …   Wikipedia

  • widow — ► NOUN 1) a woman who has lost her husband by death and has not married again. 2) humorous a woman whose husband is often away participating in a specified sport or activity: a golf widow. ► VERB (be widowed) ▪ become a widow or widower. ORIGIN… …   English terms dictionary

  • widow — [wid′ō] n. [ME widwe < OE widewe, akin to Ger witwe, L vidua < IE * widhewo , separated < base * weidh , to separate: see DIVIDE] 1. a woman who has outlived the man to whom she was married at the time of his death; esp., such a woman… …   English World dictionary

  • Widow —   [engl.] Hurenkind …   Universal-Lexikon

  • widow — {{11}}widow (n.) O.E. widewe, widuwe, from P.Gmc. *widewo (Cf. O.S. widowa, O.Fris. widwe, M.Du., Du. weduwe, Du. weeuw, O.H.G. wituwa, Ger. Witwe, Goth. widuwo), from PIE adj. *widhewo (Cf. Skt. vidhuh lonely, solitary, vidhava …   Etymology dictionary


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