adversary evidence

Evidence otherwise inadmissible which one of the parties is permitted to introduce by reason of similar or related evidence which has been tendered by his opponent. 29 Am J2d Ev § 267.

Ballentine's law dictionary. . 1998.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • adversary — ad·ver·sary 1 / ad vər ˌser ē/ n: one that contends with or opposes another; esp: any of the opposing parties in a legal action adversary 2 adj: of, relating to, or involving opposing parties or interests; specif: of, relating to, or involving a… …   Law dictionary

  • adversary system — n. A method of adjudication in which active and unhindered parties, usually through their lawyers, contest with each other and present support in favor of their respective positions, usually through the examination and cross examination of… …   Law dictionary

  • evidence — /ev i deuhns/, n., v., evidenced, evidencing. n. 1. that which tends to prove or disprove something; ground for belief; proof. 2. something that makes plain or clear; an indication or sign: His flushed look was visible evidence of his fever. 3.… …   Universalium

  • adversary procedure — In Anglo American law, the principal method of offering evidence in court. It requires the opposing sides to present pertinent information and to introduce and cross examine witnesses before a jury and/or a judge. Each side must conduct its own… …   Universalium

  • Federal Rules of Evidence — The Federal Rules of Evidence (FRE) govern the admission of facts by which parties in the federal courts of the United States may prove their cases. They were the product of protracted academic, legislative, and judicial examination before they… …   Wikipedia

  • going forward with the evidence — The burden of proof in the sense of the duty of producing evidence to meet the evidence produced or the prima facie case made by one s adversary. 29 Am J2d Ev § 124 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Adversarial system — The adversarial system (or adversary system) of law is the system of law, generally adopted in common law countries, that relies on the skill of each advocate representing his or her party s positions and involves an impartial person, usually a… …   Wikipedia

  • Eleanor Swift — is a professor at the University of California, Berkeley s Boalt Hall School of Law. She is best known for her work on the theory of evidence, and additionally teaches civil procedure, the legal profession, and periodic seminars.Early careerUpon… …   Wikipedia

  • India — /in dee euh/, n. 1. Hindi, Bharat. a republic in S Asia: a union comprising 25 states and 7 union territories; formerly a British colony; gained independence Aug. 15, 1947; became a republic within the Commonwealth of Nations Jan. 26, 1950.… …   Universalium

  • Christianity — /kris chee an i tee/, n., pl. Christianities. 1. the Christian religion, including the Catholic, Protestant, and Eastern Orthodox churches. 2. Christian beliefs or practices; Christian quality or character: Christianity mixed with pagan elements; …   Universalium

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