approve

To confirm, ratify, sanction, or consent to, some act or thing done by another. Board of Education v Reno Community High School, 124 Kan 175, 257 P 957. As used in a statute giving an officer power to "approve" an application, it is not ordinarily limited to a mere verification of the facts as stated in the application, but involves a grant of discretionary power, complete unless limited by the statute, and implies knowledge, the exercise of discretion after knowledge, and the act of passing judgment. McCarten v Sanderson, 111 Mont 407, 109 P2d 1108, 132 ALR 1229. "To approve," especially where it is a public officer who is to give sanction, is to go beyond an unexpressed mental acquiescence; his sanction should be given with certainty and by an unmistakable sign or declaration. People * Hall, 140 Cal App 745, 31 P2d 83 1. Approval by * finance committee of a municipality means that the members of the committee, acting upon their official responsibilities and having in view the public welfare, are to investigate and sanction according to their own independent judgment each separate item. It is not a ministerial function but implies active and important prudential obligations. Brown v Newburyport, 209 Mass 259, 95 NE 504. A sense of the term much less familiar is that of accusing. A person who is indicted for crime is said to approve another person when he, the approver, before plea, confesses and accuses the other of the offense. In a sense that seems to have become obsolete; to "approve" land means to improve it by cultivation and reclamation.

Ballentine's law dictionary. . 1998.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Approve — Ap*prove , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Approved}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Approving}.] [OE. aproven, appreven, to prove, OF. aprover, F. approuver, to approve, fr. L. approbare; ad + probare to esteem as good, approve, prove. See {Prove}, and cf. {Approbate}.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • approve — UK US /əˈpruːv/ verb ► [T] to accept, allow, or officially agree to something: » The measure was approved by the Senate Committee on Local and Municipal Affairs. »The aluminum producer could begin recalling workers on Tuesday if the union… …   Financial and business terms

  • approve — approve, endorse, sanction, accredit, certify mean to have or to express a favorable opinion of. Approve often means no more than this {daring them . . . to approve her conduct Conrad} Sometimes, however, it suggests esteem or admiration {Jane… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • approve of sb — approve of sb/sth ► to have a good opinion of someone or something: »Close to 90% of people approve of his handling of the crisis. Main Entry: ↑approve …   Financial and business terms

  • approve — ap·prove vt ap·proved, ap·prov·ing: to give formal or official sanction to: ratify Congress approved the proposed budget Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • approve — (v.) c.1300, to demonstrate, prove; mid 14c., to attest (something) with authority, from O.Fr. aprover (Mod.Fr. approuver) approve, agree to, from L. approbare to assent to as good, regard as good, from ad to (see AD (Cf. ad )) + probare to try,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • approve — [v1] agree something is good accept, acclaim, admire, applaud, appreciate, approbate, be big on*, commend, countenance, esteem, face it, favor, go along with, grin and bear it*, handle, like, live with*, praise, put up with, regard highly,… …   New thesaurus

  • approve — ► VERB 1) (often approve of) believe that someone or something is good or acceptable. 2) officially acknowledge as satisfactory. ORIGIN Old French aprover, from Latin approbare …   English terms dictionary

  • approve — [ə pro͞ov′] vt. approved, approving [ME aproven < OFr aprover < L approbare < ad , to + probare, to try, test < probus, good] 1. to give one s consent to; sanction; confirm 2. to be favorable toward; think or declare to be good,… …   English World dictionary

  • Approve — Ap*prove ([a^]p*pr[=oo]v ), v. t. [OF. aprouer; a (L. ad) + a form apparently derived fr. the pro, prod, in L. prodest it is useful or profitable, properly the preposition pro for. Cf. {Improve}.] (Eng. Law) To make profit of; to convert to one s …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • approve of — index countenance, permit Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

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