action of book account or book debt

See book debt.

Ballentine's law dictionary. . 1998.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • action of book debt — A form of common law action for the recovery of claims, such as are usually evidenced by a book account …   Black's law dictionary

  • book debt — A common law form of action to recover for such items as are the proper subjects of book charge, that is, proper for entry or charge in a book of account. Newton v Higgins, 2 Vt 366, 369. See book of account …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • debt — n [Old French dette, ultimately from Latin debita, plural of debitum debt, from neuter of debitus, past participle of debere to owe] 1: something owed: as a: a specific sum of money or a performance due another esp. by agreement (as a loan… …   Law dictionary

  • Debt — For other uses, see Debt (disambiguation). Personal finance Credit and debt Pawnbroker Student loan Employment contract …   Wikipedia

  • United States public debt — Part of a series of articles on Unit …   Wikipedia

  • United States debt-ceiling crisis — Part of a series of articles on Unit …   Wikipedia

  • Current account — This article is about the macroeconomic current account. For day to day bank accounts, see Current account (banking). Cumulative Current Account Balance 1980–2008 (US$ Billions) based on the International Monetary Fund data In economics, the… …   Wikipedia

  • To strike an account — Strike Strike, v. t. [imp. {Struck}; p. p. {Struck}, {Stricken}({Stroock}, {Strucken}, Obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Striking}. Struck is more commonly used in the p. p. than stricken.] [OE. striken to strike, proceed, flow, AS. str[=i]can to go,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trover — is a form of lawsuit in common law countries for recovery of damages for wrongful taking of personal property. Trover belongs to a series of remedies for such wrongful taking, its distinctive feature being recovery only for the value of whatever… …   Wikipedia

  • Detinue — Tort law Part of the …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.